Saturday, February 7, 2009

Chris Rock's documentary "Good Hair" entered into Sundance Film Festival

"Good Hair," one of 16 films in Sundance's U.S. documentary competition, follows Rock from the Bronner brothers show to neighborhood salons, businesses dealing in hair-care products and the streets of India, where human hair is a huge export industry for hair weaves.

"I thought, wow, this would make a great movie, but that was like 15 years ago, and no one was making funny documentaries 15 years ago," Rock said in an interview Tuesday alongside Nia Long, one of many actresses and other celebrities Rock interviews in the film.

"So you cut to now, and I have daughters, and I'm really dealing with them and their hair a lot, and my friends have daughters, and we talk about our daughters' hair issues. I kind of saw where to go at it, and now people are making funny documentaries," he said.

"I was kind of scared to come to Sundance in a sense, because I think this is the blackest movie ever made," said Rock, a producer and co-writer on the film. "So I was kind of scared to come to Utah, because it's so white."

But Rock said Sundance crowds have given "Good Hair" an enthusiastic reception, bolstering his hopes that it can find a broad audience. Produced by HBO, "Good Hair" eventually will air on the cable channel, but Rock and his collaborators are considering a theatrical release first.

While loaded with the 43-year-old actor-comedian's wisecracking humor, "Good Hair" also raises serious questions about identity and equality among black women who feel they need long, straight, silky hair to fit into white society.

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